Rumors of my demise…

If it wasn’t bad enough that I haven’t updated this site in… well, ages, The Little Czech Primer was down for several days because of a domain registration snafu. Yes, I’m still here, despite the lack of updates. I’ve been busy lately with my new baby girl, who turned 1 this summer. She has a talent for taking up all my time, and for pressing that big round button on the front of the computer when she gets near it.

But tell you what, if there are any faithful Czech Primer fans still out there, or even if you’re a new visitor here, let’s get the ball rolling again: Post a comment here with your favorite difficult Czech word. It might be the one that you find hardest to pronounce, or the one that you never can seem to remember. I’ll pick from those and post some new entries.

5 thoughts on “Rumors of my demise…”

  1. I haven’t learned much Czech yet, so at this point all words are difficult to remember. Grandmother/grandfather seem like a good place to start, though.

  2. Owen,

    So far, the hardest word (phrase)to pronounce I’ve come across is přesvědčil jste mě. I started learning Czech after visiting Prague this summer.

    This is one of the nicest web sites I’ve ever come across. Is there a way to print out more than one word/card per page? I love the drawings.

    Maybe John Kerry will win. Bad election news: A few Republican secretaries of state are coming up with creative new ways to discount ballots a la Florida 2000.

    Congratulations on your baby girl.

    Jennifer
    Berkeley, California

    P.S. Can you offer any advice about visiting the Czech Republic outside Prague?

  3. I think (for now) the simplest word causes me all sorts of problems….For the life of me I botch ctyri (four) each and every time…..My Czech teacher claims I’m doing ok but I think he’s just being nice. 🙂

  4. Všechno is hard too.

    I’d like to nominate a few candidates for new Czech Primer cards: hnědĂ˝, oranžovĂ˝, and fialovĂ˝ (just to complete the barvy cards). MĂ­t, dát(si), mam rad/rada. Kolo, tužka, taška, noviny. My tutor used the word “žak” (pl. žĂˇci) for “student,” but I’ll have to check that one.

    I don’t think the smutnĂ˝ guy looks smutnĂ˝! I would have guessed “working class.” I like the drawing, though.

    Jennifer

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